Fine Art

Biljana Jankovic by CreativPaper

Born in Nis, Serbia, artist Biljana Jankovic, graduated in 2001 from the Faculty of Fine Arts Cetinje, Montenegro, where she completed her Master studies in painting. She has since participated in over fifty group exhibitions in the country and abroad. She has also presented her work independently six times. In her latest body of work titled 'Manuscript', one sentence is rewritten overlapping and annulling the previously written, without space and pause, in the given format, in a special time interval which is then established and leaving behind the rhythmic trace as a consequence of the process.

 

 

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Manuscript 1, detail, 77 x 56 cm

Manuscript 1, detail, 77 x 56 cm

Manuscript, polyptyh, 2016 ink on paper

Manuscript, polyptyh, 2016 ink on paper

Ann Tygett Jones by CreativPaper

As if growing up and studying in a culturally rich city like St. Louis was not enough, artist Ann Tygett Jones has also spent time in New Zealand and Northern California before returning to The Gateway City. Art classes during summers as a child were where she first explored her creativity which quickly transformed into a passion. Her work, characterised by bright, vivid colours, textures and movement is a visual treat, with swathes of emotion layered in between. Fuelled by experiences in life she translates everyday events into her abstract work. You can find out more about her work via the links below. 

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Big Sky 2, 2017, acrylic on stretched canvas

Big Sky 2, 2017, acrylic on stretched canvas

Condensation, 2015, acrylic on stretched canvas. 

Condensation, 2015, acrylic on stretched canvas. 

Gilded Abstract, acrylic on stretched canvas with gold foil. 

Gilded Abstract, acrylic on stretched canvas with gold foil. 

Willow Banks by CreativPaper

Northern California certainly has its share of beautiful landscape, from its mountain ranges to the rugged yet captivating coastline there's plenty to be inspired by. Painter and printmaker Willow Banks draws inspiration from mother nature around her, channelling its beauty through her work.

In our conversation with this California native, we touch on the landscape, her inspiration growing up and the internal struggle one faces as an artist.


What is it about the natural beauty of Northern California that makes it a unique place to live? Not just as an artist?

There are still open expanses of land that you can escape into I grew up here, and I have a natural affinity for these layers of hills folding into themselves, the distant tree lines and glimpses of the ocean. The coast is very rugged and raw, and the surf and beaches are often dangerous—definitely not a Coney Island experience. On cold, windswept days when the fog is in, it’s a particularly soulful place to be.
 
Who was your favourite artist growing up and why?

I loved, and will always love, Nicolas de Staël—his palate, the way he applied paint. Many years ago, I was visiting a friend in Paris and was fortunate to see a De Staël exhibit at The Centres Georges Pompidou; it was an incredible experience. What I truly love about De Staël’s work is how I feel his landscapes—the sea, sky and coastline—before I see them, they enter first through my heart, not my head. Robert Motherwell and Helen Frankenthaler were also two of my early favourites.
 
When you come across a natural feature, what elements inspire you to paint it?

I like the intersection of things, the way the hills and tree lines converge, creating distinct, almost geometrical shapes. We get a lot of fog here, and that creates another layered element, with bits of trees and escarpment seen through the whitewash…I’m inspired to capture the feel of a place, the light, rather than an exact image.
 
What is your favourite part about being an artist?

I like when I’m working, and everything is flowing and time just falls away and new things emerge that I think might be good. This, unfortunately, doesn’t happen a lot. Usually, I have to fight my way into creativity. It helps if there’s some part of the canvas that I think is working, which inspires me to continue, to keep at it. I think I read somewhere that Hemingway always began his writing day by re-reading the last page he wrote—assuming he liked what he last wrote, similar concept!

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What led you to choose your favourite media?

I like being able to layer paint, to move from thick to thin—and because I’m impatient, and because acrylic dries fast, it seems like a good fit for me. Also, less expensive than oils, which is a good thing.
 
Are there any other artists from Northern California whose work you admire?

I greatly admire and have always been inspired by Richard Diebenkorn, especially during his time in Albuquerque when his palate and paintings became informed and shaped by that south-west landscape. I like all the Bay Area figurative artists: David Park, Elmer Bischoff, Joan Brown.
 
If you could summarise Willow Banks the person in 3 words what would they be?

This is a tough question; I’m afraid my answer might change from day to day…but, if I had to go with broad brushstrokes, I’d say: independent, unconventional, wistful.

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Gina Brown by CreativPaper

Gina Brown graduated from Newcastle University in 2012 with a BA degree with Honours in Fine Art. She has since been represented by online gallery New Blood Art and is currently represented by Lane House Arts, Bath. Gina continues to establish her presence in the artistic community with open submissions and exhibitions. She has exhibited in group exhibitions in London, Newcastle, Bolton and Bath, and was shortlisted for both the Neo:art prize 2013 and New Lights art prize 2013, where she was awarded the Curzon Ripon art prize which resulted in a solo show in Spring 2014. She has also created a new Signature Collection of apparel that represents a selection of her artwork; authentic to the key themes of her practice. 

Alma in Napoli.

Alma in Napoli.

Gina’s work was selected for the National Open Art Exhibition 2016, where she was honoured to receive the Peaches Miniature Award. 

Gina’s paintings translate an archive of old photographic material. Her phantom images are devoid of facial detail, giving her work a haunting poignancy. With a deft use of oil paint Gina shows a deep understanding of the Gothic and Sublime. 

Gladys.

Gladys.