Photographer

Ioana Vrabie by CreativPaper

Even with all the advances in digital photography, there is something captivating about using film. It could be the fact that it requires a certain amount of patience and discipline, in a world that’s obsessed with instant gratification, or the fact that you only have a number of shots to use, making each one count.

Photographer Ioana Vrabie, who was born in Transylvania, Romania is known for her dreamlike multiple-exposure compositions that incorporate contrasting elements, reflecting the contrast she experienced growing up in communist Romania and capitalist Italy. She replicates and releases the same tension, by surfing the emotion (energy in motion) arising between two or more visual layers in her photographs. 

Her images are a manifestation of the calm restlessness of life, as experienced through a heightened sense of awareness.

She enrolled in the University of Arts in London in the mid-2000’s, graduating with a bachelors in Photography. She currently spends her time between Ibiza, Spain and London, United Kingdom building an archive of beauty through her lens.

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Kali: Change, analogue double exposure, Ubud 2014

Kali: Change, analogue double exposure, Ubud 2014

Roots Of Humanity, analogue double exposure, Ubud 2014

Roots Of Humanity, analogue double exposure, Ubud 2014

Lotus: From Mud To Flower, analogue triple exposure, Bali 2014

Lotus: From Mud To Flower, analogue triple exposure, Bali 2014

Sifting Through Life, analogue double exposure, Bali 2014

Sifting Through Life, analogue double exposure, Bali 2014

We Need To Talk — God, analogue double exposure, London 2014

We Need To Talk — God, analogue double exposure, London 2014

Dagur Jonsson by CreativPaper

 

Dagur Jonsson is a Icelandic photographer his work is categorised into four themes. Winter in Iceland, Sunsets, Northern Lights and Icelandic Landscape - where he try's to capture multitude of subjects including the open roads, lonely houses, wide ares and abandoned places whilst reminding the viewer of the beauty of isolation and being along in nature.

500px Photo ID: 116199003

"I have always considered myself an artistic person and I have always been involved in art in one way or another. Photographing is an exciting form of expression for me and I love capturing everyday moment with a moody feeling to it. For me the storytelling of a photo is very important and I try to connect with people’s emotion through my photography. Subjects like Landscapes with dramatic clouds, captivating sunlight’s, moody winter scene and the beautiful Northern Lights are a special interest to me."

Barrie Dale by CreativPaper

As a Scientist, Barrie Dale is appalled at the way that human beings are destroying the life-support system that Planet Earth provides; it is now possible to envisage a point at which all of Nature will have been destroyed: by us.  Once we have destroyed it we will have destroyed ourselves.

barrie-dale-creativpaper

As an Artist, he sees great danger in the fact that Nature is no longer seen as a source of inspiration to mainstream Artists.  This gives politicians and businessmen the idea that Nature no longer matters, and can be exploited at will.  If nobody, not even artists, regard it as important what does it matter?  

Well, it matters because, even though humans have produced many beautiful things, none of them surpasses what Nature has achieved.  Every time you look at natural forms more closely than you have before you find something new, and unexpectedly beautiful. 

Barrie Dale has sold hundreds of paintings and has given a number of music recitals, but is now committed to photography as a means of getting as close as possible to the un-varnished truth about natural beauty.  There is no artificial lighting and no computer manipulation in his work.  He believes in letting the camera tell us what it will, even when it appears to contradict what it is we think we are seeing.

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Gustavo Lacerda by CreativPaper

ALBINO SERIES

"The shyness and singular beauty of people with albinism have always captured my attention."

The photophobia caused by the absence of melanin lead them to live literally in the shadow. And as photography is basically light, I thought it would be instigating and revealing to subvert paradigms and bring them to the position of “protagonists”. Between 2009 and 2014 I worked on this project and experienced a great challenge: research, locate and try and convince some of these people to come into my studio and let them be photographed. The plasticity is explored by the softness of the passages in pastel shades which permeate the work and resemble the paintings of great artist such Edgard Degas. 

Raimunda

Raimunda

Beautiful portraits carved by hand, no detail is there by chance. The clothes, the people, the way they pose for the portrait, the backdrops decorated with delicate motifs are not there as an inflamed critic on the situation of albinos as different people; rather, the narrative orbits around the unique beauty that flows out of them. When I see these photographs, I feel the will to touch, to softly stroke them and smell the sweetness of each one of theses colours.

Oleneide, Italo and Renan

Oleneide, Italo and Renan

As soft as the images is the way the text is connected to the work. Names, no surnames. Names of people who now seem so close to artist. An intimate, delicate and respectful closeness.”

Cristian

Cristian

Fabiane

Fabiane

COME UPON ME by CreativPaper

Tess Bukowsky observes the narratives within southern America monumental landscapes and religion.

Come Unto Me was developed when I spent some time living in Texas. I was raised as an atheist in Australia and found myself in truly unfamiliar territory living within the Bible Belt. During my time in the south I built friendships with people who were deeply religious individuals or had, at some point in their lives, been living as devout believers. 

I was so preoccupied by how religion played such a part in the way they moved through life – the decisions they made, how they viewed things… even those who had given up the belief in a higher power – they were bound by it but in a different way. They seemed less concerned by the daily drudgery of their lives because their time on earth was merely the beginning of their ‘journey’. It is a hard thing to articulate outside of the conversations that I was having with these people. But so often it baffled me that this invisible force could have such a grip on their existence. 

My series, Come Unto Me became a reflection of the seemingly insignificant narratives I witnessed in the every day grind of America. Most of what I shot for the series was shot in the Bible Belt. The religious connotations aren’t blaringly obvious in every single still – mainly because I didn’t want to isolate any of my audience in what I was feeling was to be my debut series of work. Of course I had more content that I have created over the years but I felt that Come Unto Me was my first complete and fully realised collection that I wanted to be out there in the world. 

Some photographers are builders and some are collectors. Collectors shoot the world around them, collecting snippets of every day life – the extraordinary and the ordinary. Builders create what they want in a still. They build an image to suit what they need out of a picture.  I’m a collector. I shoot what I find right in front of me. It might look like nothing sometimes but in my mind there is a complete narrative within the still image. People been and gone, the life previously lived but long forgotten. To me that is the truth. I’m not meddling with a story -  I’m simply capturing it. The series is mostly composed of landscapes, because I like to focus on the unseen. As I said before there are narratives everywhere. People may not be present but they’ve been there. They have lived through that space. I think we like to brush over the small things. We look to the big things, the pretty and important things but there is something to be said in the abandoned landscapes that I love to capture. Something in them also reminds me of relationships with god along those Bible Belt towns. Without the people, they felt godless – isolated and left behind. 

I think that is really closely linked to why I prefer film to digital. I’m a traditionalist; I just want to relay the most honest depiction of what I can see through my eyes. It also makes me really careful, I can’t just click away. I’ve got to really want that shot before I take it. 

I was reading a lot of Raymond Carver and Richard Ford at the time and I can really see that coming through in the series. That part of America can feel desolate and forsaken and they are things that really come through in the writing that I was submerging myself in at the time.  It’s the poetry in the emptiness of it, if you get my gist. 

Full Photography series available to view here from our Facebook page.

Words and Photography by Tess Bukowsky.